Writing

PressThis: How to Become a Travel Writer (seriously)


For a little over a year, I have thought about traveling since it’s something that I love to do but don’t get a chance to… hardly. I always wanted to explore the world, nationally and internationally since I was a young girl.

For those of you who have been following me a while, you know I love to write. Writing is a lifelong passion of mines and a way of life. Anyway, although I am working hard on my craft, to get my content, stories, etc out there, I’m not giving up. Some things been going on and I won’t speak negative on them.

I am, though, considering other ways, just haven’t started, though I am sharing what I researched for anyone who may be thinking about trying travel writing out.

I’ve included a preview below on tips for becoming a travel writer. You can click on the link to learn more. Hope this helps anyone.


How to become a travel writer.
1. Read.

Start reading and don’t stop.

Read all the “greats,” but don’t skip the more obscure writers. Read magazines. Get yourself a library card if you don’t have one, and if you can’t do that, check Google Books and Google Magazines.

The idea isn’t to imitate, but to simply know what — what genres, what styles, what writers — came before you, as well as who your contemporaries are.

2. Redefine the genre of travel writing.

“Travel writing” includes hotel reviews and destination guides, published in guidebooks and in glossy travel magazines. But travel writing’s more than service pieces.

Check out this genre-busting, long-format narrative by Porter Fox. Or this blog postu by multi-genre writer Elizabeth Eslami, which I’d categorize as “place-based writing.”

In a way, all movement and all settling is travel, and so the stories we tell about these experiences are “travel writing” in the broadest sense of the word. Even if some editors don’t see it that way.

3. Start a blog.

In the not-so-distant past, a writer had to have a decent portfolio of publication credits to be considered a “travel writer,” and certainly to be published in a glossy mag.

Not so anymore.

Thousands of writers have published their writing primarily or exclusively on their blogs. Some have gotten book deals. Some have gotten print gigs. Some get offers of free travel. And some get nothing more than the recognition that their writing means something to a random reader who stumbled across their blog doing a Google search.

Not sure how to get started? Check out Matador’s stockpile of blogging tips.

4. Develop your online presence.

Use Facebook, Twitter, and other social media platforms to connect with other writers, editors, and readers.

5. Build a network, online and off.

Start your blog, set up a Facebook and Twitter account, but make sure you get offline, too. Stories and relationships don’t develop best through a screen. That only happens at ground level.

MatadorU hosts frequent workshops and events around the world.

6. Travel. But not just to “exotic” places.

You’ve got a 9-5’er. You’ve got kids. You’ve got debt. You’ve got no money. You’ve got an expired passport.

What you’ve got are excuses. A walk beyond your front door is travel. The only thing you need for a trip is curiosity.

Click the link below to read 22 tips for becoming a travel writer.

Source: How to become a travel writer (seriously)

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Writing

PressThis: Amazon KDP Select: Is It Worthwhile for Authors? by CJ Lyons #NaNoWriMo2018 


As we write our novels, short stories, poems whether we’re participating in NaNoWriMo or not, we all have it in our minds what we planning on doing next with them. You can be thinking about going the traditional route – finding an agent or a publisher. But what about if you are interested in self-publishing your work.

This article is very informative and useful. It shines the light on what KDP Select is and whether you may or may think it’s the best choice for you. It covered topics on:

  • 90 days exclusivity
  • Income from lending
  • Five free days
  • Income vs. Exposure

For those of you who are thinking about doing this- publishing it yourself, have you thought about where or what programs to go with? It could be KDP Select (going exclusive with Amazon.) Or, CreateSpace and IngramSpark.

For those of you who already self-published, which route(s) have you taken? Let us know in the comments. Thanks in advance.


Should authors take advantage of the Amazon KDP Select program? A comprehensive discussion of who the program is well-suited for, plus best strategies.

Source: Amazon KDP Select: Is It Worthwhile for Authors? by CJ Lyons

Writing

PressThis: The Complete Guide to Ebook Publishing Platforms • Reedsy #MondayBlogs #indiepublishing



Before I had shared an article from Reedsy all about writing, editing, marketing, etc. your novel. If you are interested in self-publishing, please check the link above and click on the source link.

In this post, they covered the fundamental on eBook publishing and distribution. Please do check them out if interested in learning more about getting your novel out there in an eBook format and the best way to go with it.

The list of contents below are what they covered:

Contents

What you need before you publish: formats, ISBNs & more
Amazon exclusivity vs “going wide”
Ebook publishing platforms and retailers
Infographic: Reedsy’s recommended ebook distribution setup
Comparative table of royalties by publishing platform and retailer
Gearing up for your launch: setting up pre-orders, metadata, and pricing


What are the best ebook publishing platforms? How can you get your book on all ebook stores? We cover everything you need to know about ebook distribution.
Source: The Complete Guide to Ebook Publishing Platforms • Reedsy

Writing

PressThis: How to Self-Publish a Book: The Sweet Science of Indie Publishing #MondayBlogs #publishing #indieauthors



Hi everyone! How was your weekend? Over the last few days, well, actually, over the last several months ago, I’ve been researching about independent publishing. It seem like the best route to go than with an agency. But, which ever route you choose is up to you.

Reedsy is a company that helps authors with editing and such. I had came across their blog about self-publishing through an email. It is a guide for authors who decides to take that route. It’s long, informative, and has a breakdown on each step to take. (Below are the steps they covered.)
Whether you publish on CreateSpaceIngramSpark, both, or BookBaby, the info Reedsy provided can help you out a lot, and save you a lot of time and money. Please do check it out.

Below are the areas of self publishing they covered:

  • Bypassing the Gatekeepers: Advantages of Self-Publishing
  • Two Common Approaches to Self-Publishing
  • Write the Book
  • Edit the Manuscript
  • Design the Cover and Format the Interior
  • Publish as an eBook and in Print
  • Master the Kindle Store (and Other Retailers)
  • Market Your Book Effectively
  • Create an Awesome Launch Plan
  • The Dollars and Cents
  • Additional Resources

 


Learning how to self-publish a book has never been simpler. Follow these steps and find out how to become the next indie publishing sensation by writing, editing, and marketing your book properly.

Source: How to Self-Publish a Book: The Sweet Science of Indie Publishing

Blogging

PressThis: How To Balance our Shiva (Masculine Energy) & Shakti (Feminine Energy): 6 Tips.


I have come across an article that explained the balance of masculine and feminine energies. Regardless of your gender, it had been said that we hold both the masculine and feminine energies. I had shared the 6 tips from their article on how to balance the energies. It’s informative and useful, and if you like to, you can click on link to read more.

(Below are the 6 tips you can use to balance the masculine and feminine energies based on the Elephant Journal article.)


Here are some of the practices to establish Shiva and Shakti balance:

1. Laugh.

Laughter is the highest form of spirituality, in my opinion. The heart is wide open, the belly is filled with oxygen, and it is a complete cleanse for the energetic system. Laughter softens us and allows us to be more present and therefore receptive.

2. Own your sensuality.

Do you even know how you like to be touched? What smells do you love? What is your favorite food? What do you love to look at? What music entices your ears? Bathe yourself in all the things that excite your senses. Give yourself the gift of sensuality. Be slow and feel.

3. Get into nature.

Nature is the perfect example of masculine and feminine balance. Just look at a tree. Those roots are pretty deep and are essential otherwise the tree will not be able to stand. The leaves, however, are dancing around. They are contained by the branches which are contained by the roots. All parts are equally necessary.

4. Move into relationship.

Being in relationship has been my greatest teacher—I had to surrender and pretty much destroy my former self in order to be in it fully. Instead of subscribing to the mental thought wave that I am “losing my freedom” by being in relationship, I chose to focus on what I’m gaining. I have learned more about myself, my habits, my fears, and my desires by being with someone than I had by being alone. We are wired to be connected with other people and other people serve as a mirror.

The feminine aspect of relationship comes when two people pay attention to the relationship’s energy instead of rushing to label it. I recently overheard a couple on a first date talking about marriage and kids. Relationships have a frequency of their own, and slowing down and tuning into that is a skill only the feminine can allow.

5. Travel.

Travel takes us out of our routines and out of our minds. Be spontaneous. I don’t suggest on partaking in a pre-planned tour for this exercise. Go somewhere you have never been and don’t stay in a hotel. Rent an Air B & B or stay with a local family. Eat the local food. Go out and make new friends. Trust your intuition as you find yourself in a new place.

6. Alternate Nostril Breathing.

Alternate nostril breathing, otherwise known as Nadi Shodhana, is an uplifting and calming breathing practice that works in just a few minutes. This practices works directly with the right and left sides of the body and brain to cultivate harmony and mental clarity. It helps us clear blocked energy streams in the body.

Directions:
Sit comfortably with a tall spine. Place your left hand on your lap, palm face up or face down. With your right hand, fold down your index and middle finger so they are gently touching the center of your palm. Place your ring finger on your left nostril and softly close the nostril. Take a deep slow breath in through your right nostril. When the breath is full, then gently switch and release your left nostril and close off your right nostril with your thumb. Close your eyes. Take a long, slow exhale through your left nostril. When the lungs are empty, keep the hand as it is and take another deep breath in through your left nostril. When you reach the top, repeat by switching to exhale through your right. Inhale again through your right nostril, switch fingers, and exhale through your left. Repeat. Five minutes per day is all you need.

Source: How To Balance our Shiva (Masculine Energy) & Shakti (Feminine Energy): 6 Tips.